Medical corporation Okochikai, Okochi Naika Clinic

Chairman and clinic director

Masahiro Okochi

Masahiro Okochi
Make every effort to offer medical services that move people.

I was unconscious for three days when I had meningitis as a child. My attending physician worked hard and cured me successfully even though I was exposed to the risk of after-effects because my disease was so severe. If a medical doctor successfully saves someone’s life, it changes that patient’s life. This is why doctors should go beyond the routine. Do you do your best for your patients? Do you execute your role as best you can? You should ask these questions, and do the right thing at all times. This is the kind of medical care that is my goal.

Year of Birth
1964
Birthplace
Aichi
Name
Medical corporation Okochikai, Okochi Naika Clinic
Headquarters
6-7 Sakuragatakamikiri, Sobue-cho, Inazawa, Aichi
Founded
2012
Type of business
General internal medicine and diabetes internal medicine
url
https://www.okochi-cl.com/
Since I opened my own clinic in 2012, I have focused on treating patients from other countries. In reality, in Inazawa and its surroundings where my clinic is situated, small and midsize companies employ foreign workers, and many of them have problems because of the language barrier. I had troubles myself due to the differences of language and culture in 2003, when I worked as a guest researcher for about two and a half years, pioneering research on the relationship between diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease at Louisiana State University. When I had a medical checkup before working in the U.S.A., I received a tuberculosis misdiagnosis. I was taken to the hospital, having been told that a tuberculin test indicated positive reaction results. However, a tuberculosis test showed no abnormalities. The positive reactions came from the BCG vaccination that I had received as a baby to prevent tuberculosis. The situation differed between Lousiana and Japan. The American physicians were surprised because they did not know Japanese people got the BCG vaccination, perhaps due to there being so few Japanese residents in Louisiana at that time. After returning to Japan and working for the university hospital and other institutions for a while, I opened an independent clinic. I wanted to make my clinic unique. I wanted to help foreign residents living in Japan, guessing they may have problems due to language and cultural differences like I did in the U.S. I would like to support these foreign patients, and this is the idea of my medical practice.
The staff at my clinic did not agree with me at first. They doubted the necessity of a foreigner-friendly clinic in a not-very-big city. I understood them because I often heard foreign patients did not pay for medical services provided at medical institutions in Tokyo and other large cities. But there are not so many bad people here because the local companies employ foreign workers with the employees’ identity guaranteed. Many foreign workers do not speak Japanese or English, coming from Southeast Asia and South America, including Brazil. Therefore, many foreign workers had difficulty finding hospitals to accept them. I told my staff repeatedly that I had had hardships receiving medical services outside Japan and I didn’t want foreign workers to have the same problems. It is our clinic that can help them. It took one or two years until the staff accepted foreign patients without hesitation. Little by little, empathic staff increased. Today, all the staff members handle foreign patients in cooperation. Our patients are from many different countries. To identify the language they speak, we ask them to point to the applicable one on a list of national flags. When the language is identified, the staff will use a translation device to have a conversation and ask patients to fill in a multilingual medical interview sheet. These ideas came from our staff. They are making efforts every day to overcome language barriers and make foreign patients feel comfortable, for example, learning English by inviting an English conversation teacher to our clinic.
As a professional, automatically, you should go beyond expectations without rushing tasks. Recently, I have often told our staff that we should be the Amazon of healthcare. Amazon has perfectly realized customer-oriented services with large-scale warehouses and its original delivery system. Translating its industry into healthcare, we would like to offer patient-oriented services. As part of this, we are trying to accelerate medical checkups and medical certificate issuance, transmit multilingual information, and publicly show how we perform examinations and surgical operations for transparency. It is also necessary to broaden the scope of our specialties. I have recently started to offer immunotherapy for cancer although my specialties are originally diabetes and the digestive system. To detect cancer early, I am trying to upgrade the quality of medical care, for example, introducing preventative care, and trying to improve the level of patient hospitality. The ideal level of hospitality for our clinic is always thinking of and anticipating what we can do and put it into practice instead of just meeting patients’ requests. We should work hard every day and provide medical services that can move patients. We can do more in the fast-advancing medical care world. You can work miracles if you think about what you can do for your patients. I will be happy if patients rely on Okochi Naika Clinic in dire situations. I want to make our clinic the place that patients turn to when large-scale hospitals fail them in their search for a permanent cure.
Masahiro Okochi
Masahiro Okochi

*Information accurate as of time of publication.

Medical corporation Okochikai, Okochi Naika Clinic

Chairman and clinic director
Masahiro Okochi